STEAMBOATS BUILT IN WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA 1815 – 1900 by John Bowman

Wheeling began building boats, Barges, Bateaux, Flatboats, Keelboats, and Pirogues in 1774, the first Ohio River city to build boats, and the third settlement on the ‘Western Rivers’ to have a boat building industry.  ‘Western Rivers’ are rivers that flow into the Gulf of Mexico.  Red Stone Old Fort now Brownsville, Pennsylvania was building boats for the Army in the 1750s.  Pittsburgh was building boats for the Army in the 1760s; both were on the Monongahela River. 

Listed in alphabetical order are the 225 Steamboats built at Wheeling.  Wheeling, Virginia built the first successful steamboat, the Washington in 1815.  In 1769, Wheeling was born a town in the State of Virginia.  June 20, 1863, Wheeling became a town in the State of West Virginia, the 35th state admitted to the union.

The 1815 Steamboat Washington The First Successful Steamboat on the ‘Western Rivers’ Model by John Bowman

In 1900, the City of Wheeling was the last steamboat completed at Wheeling, seen here September 2nd 1900 at Wheeling, West Virginia.

The City of Wheeling Steamboat at Wheeling’s Wharf Sep 2, 1900

Wheeling boat yards built complete steamboats.  Steamboat hulls were built in Wheeling and the steamboat’s cabins were completed elsewhere.  By the 1850s with heavy timber becoming scarce near Wheeling, boat builders would have many of their hulls built elsewhere, and then have them towed to Wheeling for the machinery, cabin carpentry and furnishings.  In addition, with the B&O’s arrival, crossties needed for the railroads used up most of the hardwoods left.  Machinery, (engines, boilers) were manufactured here, but with little account of which works built them.  Phillips manufactured machinery for steamboats.  Phillips, attributed with building boats, had other hull builders and other yards and companies completed the boats.  The same said for Sweeney.  The McNaughton & Dunlevy boat yard at West Wheeling, Ohio is included, as the yard co-owned by Dunlevy and was part of his Wheeling boat building business.

Wheeling Boat Yards in 1815
Wheeling Steamboat Yards in North Wheeling

The full documentation (registration) of steamboats built at Wheeling did not start until May 9, 1850.  From May 9th through the rest of 1850, thirty-seven steamboats were registered and the register seldom listed the yard or engine builder.  I credited boats to the yards that built them, and or to the companies that installed the machinery. 

The year the boat was built, and the year it was lost or dismantled is noted.  Pertinent information is given for each entry when known.  Boat names were sometimes changed and the date (year) is noted.

Main Sources: Bowman, John, Wheeling The Birthplace of the American Steamboat Wheeling National Heritage Area Corporation, Wheeling, WV, 2008.  Way, Frederick, Jr., with Joseph W. Rutter Way’s Steam Towboat Directory, Sons and Daughters of Pioneer Rivermen, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, 1990.  Way, Frederick Jr., Way’s Packet Directory, 1848-1983 Sons and Daughters of Pioneer Rivermen, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, 1983.

Abbreviations Used ST: Stern-wheel propelled boat SW: Side-wheel propelled boat Prop: Propeller driven boat F: Ferry P: Packet boat T: Towboat Rig: Rigged together.

Boat Names are italicized and listed alphabetical

‘76                   1846-48 SW P hull built by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling, and completed at Wheeling by Dunlevy with Phillips machinery

A

A.J. Sweeney 1863-64 ST P hull built by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler and completed by A.J. Sweeney & Son.  The boat sank and the machinery went to the Bertrand Sweeney was building in 1864 

A.M. Phillips 1835-(?) P built by the James Pemberton Yard with machinery by Phillips

Alamo             1860-67 SW P built at Wheeling

Albemarle       1855-62 ST P built by James Pemberton for Capt. James C. Jelly, master, J.C. Battelle, clerk.  Albemarle used Phillips machinery and ran out of Wheeling 

Amazon           1839-43 SW P hull built at Murraysville, W. Va.  The first one built there.  Finish carpentry by the Elijah Murray Yard and machinery by A.M. Phillips.  Built for Capt. John McLure, Jr.  James H. Louderback was the master.  Louderback was a carpenter on the Washington

Amulet            1845-48 ST P hull by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling completed by Dunlevy at Wheeling 

Anna Calhoun 1835-(?) P built by James Pemberton with machinery by A.M. Phillips

Annie M.         1888-1941 ST T built by A.J. Sweeney & Son.  Renamed Leota in 1892.  She went back to her original name in 1921

Anthony Wayne 1846-51 SW P hull McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling.  Steam engines by Hobbs, Taylor & Co. of Wheeling

Apalachee       1891-99 ST P composite hull (the first) by A.J. Sweeney & Son.  Before the 1870s, Sweeney Company did not build boats, they only supplied the machinery      

Ariel                1855-60 ST P built at Wheeling

Atalanta          1853-63 ST P built at Wheeling

Atlantic           1871-85 ST T hull built at Murraysville, W. Va. and completed at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler.  This boat was a rebuild in the 1877 Atlantic with engines by Hobbs, Taylor from their towboat Ed Hobbs.  Her engines then went to the Ben Hur built in 1887

Aurilla Wood  1852-58 ST P built at Wheeling for Capt. Steve Thompson of Clarington, Ohio

Avondale        1855-56 SW P built by the James Pemberton Yard for Hans W. Phillips

B

Baltimore        1853-59 SW P hull New Martinsville, W. Va. and completed at the Wilson & Dunlevy yard by Hanes & Beam.  Machinery by Sweeney ran in the Wheeling & Louisville Union Line.

Bayou Belle    1855-60 ST P hull Murraysville, W. Va. and completed at Wheeling.  Bayou Belle went to the Confederacy in the Civil War

Beardstown     1865-71 ST P built at Wheeling and operated out of St. Louis

Belle Prince    1879-1907 ST Towboat, hull built at Freedom, Pa. and completed by Sweeney at Wheeling for Capt. Bill Prince.  This boat with Barge No. 8 removed the state records from Wheeling to Charleston in May of 1885 when the W.V. State Capitol was moved to Charleston.  The Chesapeake also took part in this move (see: Brown Photo of the Chesapeake and the front end of Barge No. 8).  Her engines came from the towboat Iron Valley that had originally been in Zane’s Island Packet

Benwood         1866-76 ST Ferry built at Wheeling, and registered as a towboat in 1872

Bermuda         1864-76 ST P built at Wheeling and completed by A.J. Sweeney & Son

Bertrand          1864-65 ST P hull by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler, and completed by A.J. Sweeney.  Her machinery came from the A.J. Sweeney, which sank and burned in 1864.  The cabin was built by Gullet of Pittsburgh, and furnished by G. Mendel of Wheeling.  The Cochrans of Clarington once owned Bertrand.  See a model of this boat at ‘Wheeling’s West Virginia Independence Hall’

Bolivar            1831-(?) P built at the Bell Yards                                         

Brave              1832-(?) P built at the Bell Yards with Phillips engines                                

Bridge City     1854-60 ST P hull built at Fish Creek and completed at Wheeling.  Bridge City was renamed Kate French in 1856

Burlington      1864-67 SW P hull built at Wheeling and the completed at Cincinnati

C

C.E. Hillman   1860-71 SW P built by Wilson & Dunlevy with machinery by Phillips.  She saw service in the Civil War, rebuilt after the war in 1865 by Hans W. Phillips

C.W. Hornbrook 1872-83 ST T hull by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler and completed by Sweeney.  Operated by the Wheeling Towboat Co., and renamed Amos in 1882

Cabinet           1849-58 SW P built at Wheeling and ran out of the Wheeling Port

Capitola          1860-65 SW P built at Wheeling and registered to Union during the Civil War.  She was then sold to Capt. James B. Thompson and later sold to Capt. Steve Thompson.  Capitola ran out of Wheeling

Carrie              1870-76 Ferry built by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler at Wheeling

Centralia         1864-68 ST P built at Wheeling       

Chief Justice Marshall 1832-38 SW P built by James Pemberton with machinery by Hans W. Phillips for Martin Phillips of Steubenville

City Of Wheeling 1853-55 SW P built at Wheeling by Wilson & Dunlevy with machinery by Phillips.  She sometimes ran out of Cincinnati in the Wheeling & Louisville Union Line, and she was once a U.S. Mail Line packet.  Capt. John McLure ran her out of Wheeling in 1855.  She was gone before 1863

City Of Wheeling 1899-1914 ST P hull and superstructure by Mozena Brothers at Clarington, Ohio for Capt. Thaddeus S. Thomas.  The last steamboat completed at Wheeling.  She was completed at the Wheeling Wharf in 1900 and ran out of Wheeling into 1904.  The boat was re-registered in 1904 as the Harry Lee and sank at Brandywine Landing 45 miles above Memphis in August of 1911.  She was shortly raised and burned again at Memphis March 19, 1914

Clarksville      1845-48 SW P hull Louisville, Kentucky.  Finish carpentry by James Pemberton, with Phillips machinery                    

Clinton            1828-(?) P built at the Bell Yards                             

Clipper            1880-86 ST P hull Mason City, W. Va. and completed at Wheeling

Colorado         1850-53 SW P hull Monongahela, Pa.  Finish Carpentry by the James Pemberton Steamboat Yard with machinery by H.W. Phillip.

Comfort          1875-77 Rig built at Wheeling to run out of Wheeling.  She exploded a boiler at Pipe Creek with ten killed

Como              1866-67 SW P built at Wheeling

Companion     1847-52 ST P built at Wheeling and ran out of Wheeling

Confidence     1845-49 SW P hull built by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling and completed at Wheeling by Dunlevy-McLure.

Consignee       1848-52 SW P built by Wilson & Dunlevy at Wheeling with machinery by Phillips

Corona            1878-89 ST P hull built at Brownsville.  Built for Capt. T.C. Sweeney, with engines by A.J. Sweeney & Son, she exploded her boiler in 1889 with a large loss of lives

Courier            1857-64 ST P built by Wilson & Dunlevy with engines by A.J. Sweeney & Son, (their fourth set constructed).  Built for Capt. John McLure, Jr. and William G. Battelle of Wheeling

Courier            1885-1918 ST P Sweeney built the hull at their Belle Vernon, Pa. yard and completed it at their Wheeling works.  She ran out of Wheeling, and at one time Capt. Tom J. Prince and Capt. J. Mack Gamble owned her

Cuba                1864-67 ST P built at Wheeling.  She burned with loss of seven lives

D

Denmark         1834-(?) P built at the Bell Yards with engines by Phillips

Dekalb            1845-49 P hall built by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling, and completed at Wheeling by Dunlevy.  She ran in the Wheeling-Cincinnati trade

Diligence        1845-49 SW P built at Wheeling 

Dime               1863-64 SW P built at Wheeling and served with the 86th Ohio Volunteer Infantry during Morgan’s Raid

Diurnal            1879-85 SW P hull at the Harmar Yard.  Sweeney finished her at Wheeling for Capt. John K. Booth, who sold her to E.K. Booth, who sold her to Capt. A.B. Booth; she was then sold to Capt. J. Mack Gamble

Dr. Franklin    1847-54 SW P hull by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling, and completed at Wheeling by Dunlevy for Capt. John McLure, Jr.  Dr. Franklin was the first steamboat supplied with a steam whistle on the Upper Mississippi River.  McLure sold in 1847 and built the Dr. Franklin No. 2 in 1848

Dr. Franklin No. 2 1848-53 SW P hull by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling and completed at Wheeling by Dunlevy for Capt. John McLure, Jr.

Dollie Webb   1858-61 ST P built at Wheeling

Drover             1862-64 SW Ferry built at Wheeling

Drover No. 3   1865-67+ SW Ferry built at Wheeling and ran at Wheeling in 1867

Dubuque         1867-79 SW P hull only was built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler.  She was completed at Pittsburgh

Duck               1875-76 plus a Rig built at Wheeling

E

E.W. Stephens 1847-53 SW P hull by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling completed at Wheeling by Dunlevy, McLure with machinery by Phillips

Eagle               1861-71 SW P built at Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler for Capt. C.H. Booth in 1862. Charles Muhleman clerk, engines by Phillips

Ed. Hobbs       1871-77 ST T hull built at Murraysville, W. Va. and owned by Ed Hobbs of Hobbs, Taylor & Company Foundry, boat operated by Wheeling Towboat & Barge Co. along with the Nail City.  Rebuilt and renamed the Atlantic, eventually the Hobbs, Taylor & Company machinery went into the packet Ben Hur

Elaine              1882-98 ST P hull built by Mozena Bros. at Clarington and completed at Wheeling by Sweeney for Capt. Fred Kimple

Ella                 1867-1884 ST Ferry built by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler at Wheeling Sweeney machinery.  Ella operated between Wheeling and West Wheeling.

Embassy          1849-56 SW P built at Wheeling an 1856 explosion killed ten and injured twenty-five

Emma Boyd    1863-64 ST P built at Wheeling

Expedition      1818-(?) P built by James Pemberton contracted to U.S. Govt. in 1818 with machinery by Phillips of Steubenville.         

Express No. 2 1870-79 SW P hull by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler and completed by Sweeney for Capt. Phil Anshutz, with E.J. Anshutz as clerk bought by Capt. A.B. Booth in 1876.  The hull in 1879 became the “Booth Battelle & Company” wharf boat.

F

Fort Henry      1853-61 ST P built at Wheeling and went to Confederate registry in 1861

Friendship       1847-54 ST P originally built in Wheeling and rebuilt in Wheeling in 1851

Freedom          1831-(?) P built at Wheeling at the Bell Yard                                  

Frolic              1860-73 SW P built at Wheeling and found in Confederate hands in 1864

G

G.W. Campbell 1856-67 ST Ferry built by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling

G.W. Forrest   1857-68 ST P built at Wheeling and in Confederate registry 1861-1865

G.W. Sparhawk 1851-56 SW P built at Wheeling

Gallatin           1860-72 SW P hull built at Brownsville completed at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with machinery by Sweeney

Garry Owen    1870-76 ST P built at Wheeling

Gem                1863-69 ST P built at Wheeling

General Meigs            1864-70 ST P built at Wheeling and renamed Allena May in 1865

George Mc C. Porter 1864-68 ST P built at Wheeling and converted into a towboat in 1868           

George W. Kendall 1849-53 SW P built at Wheeling

Golden Era      1852-68 SW P built at Wheeling.  A troop transport boat during Civil War that made three trips to Vicksburg   

Good Intent     1881-84 plus ST P built at Wheeling by Sweeney and known after 1884

H

H.D. Mears     1863-63 SW P built by James Pemberton for Capt. James C. Jelly, cabin & office lighted with ‘Johnson’s Self Generating Gas’ machinery by Phillips.  Probably the last boat built by Pemberton

H.M. Townsend 1882-1907 ST T built at Wheeling A.J. Sweeney & Son.  She was built to tow barges from West Wheeling to the Top Mill in North Wheeling

Ham Howell    1857-60 ST P hull built at Murraysville, W.Va. and completed at Wheeling

Hattie May      1864-66 SW P built by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler at Wheeling with machinery by Phillips

Havana            1863-69 ST P hull built at Parkersburg and completed at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with Sweeney machinery

Highland Mary No. 2 1848-53 SW P built at Wheeling

Highlander      1864-65 ST P built at Wheeling

Hiram B.         1875-86 plus Ferry built at Wheeling

Hudson            1875-85 ST P hull built at Murraysville, W. Va. and completed at Wheeling.  Owned by R.R. Hudson and the Lists.  Mr. R.R. Hudson also owned the steamboat R.R. Hudson

Hummingbird No. 2 1878-89 Prop P built at Wheeling with machinery from Gallipolis, Ohio.  Renamed the Chicot in 1889

I

Ida Leon          1873-76 ST P built at Wheeling

Ingomar           1858-67 ST P built in Wheeling used machinery from the Aurilla Wood

Interchange     1854-60 ST P built at Wheeling       

Ionian              1850-55 ST P built at Wheeling

Iron Valley     1873-79 ST T built in Wheeling.  A Prince owned boat.  Her engines came from the Island Packet that later went to the towboat Belle Prince in 1879

Island Packet  1846-49 ST P Ferry built at West Wheeling by McNaughton & Dunlevy and owned by the Zane family.  She ferried from Wheeling to the Wheeling Island, until the Suspension Bridge was completed.  Zanes ran a horse-propelled ferry starting in 1789

J

J.R. Pratt         1862-71 Prop Canal boat, hull built at Massillon, Ohio and machinery at Wheeling

James M. Whann 1859-61 SW Towboat hull built at Shousetown, Pa. and completed at Wheeling by Wilson & Dunlevy with machinery by Sweeney

James Means  1860-77 ST P built at Wheeling ran Wheeling Steubenville converted to towboat

Jane Nichols   1851-59 SW Ferry built at Wheeling, ran out of Wheeling-Martins Ferry, Ohio

Jennie              1859-61 ST P built at West Wheeling by McNaughton & Dunlevy.  It ran out of Bellaire      

Jefferson         1832-(?) P built at the Bell Yard with engines by A.M. Phillips

Jefferson         1849-56 ST P built at Wheeling.

Jessie B.          1873-86 plus Ferry built at Wheeling and operated from Benson’s Ferry Bellaire to landing at Bloch Bros. Tobacco Co., South Wheeling

Johnson           1818-(?) P built by James Pemberton contracted to U.S. Govt. in 1818 machinery by A.M. Phillips of Steubenville

Julia                1859-62 SW Ferry built at Wheeling

K

Kanawha         1864-70 ST T built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler Co.

Kanawha Valley 1857-61 ST P built at Wheeling used as Troop transfer in the Civil War

Kanawha Valley No. 2 1860-62 ST P built at Wheeling was Confederate transport in Civil War

Kitty Clover    1829-(?) P built at the Bell Yards, engines by Phillips of Steubenville

L

Lā Belle          1853-54 ST P built at Wheeling

Lady Boone    1835-(?) P built by James Pemberton with machinery by Phillips

La Grange       1828-(?) built at the Bell Yard

Lady Franklin 1850-56 SW P built in Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with Phillips engines

Lady Pike        1851-78+ SW P built by Dunlevy, McLure for Capt. John McLure, Jr. who was a nephew of John McLure, Sr. who built and ran the McLure Hotel in Wheeling.  She ran in the U.S. Mail line by John McLure, Jr. who took over the McLure Hotel after he left the river.  Her machinery was Phillips

Lake Superior 1870-79 SW P hull by Wilson, Dunlevy & Company, and completed at Pittsburgh

Leavenworth City 1859-59 SW P built at Wheeling

Lewellin          1864-70 ST P hull built at Parkersburg and completed at Wheeling.  Sweeney machinery

Lewis Wetzel  1848-55 SW P built at Wheeling

Liberty            1857-62 ST P built at Wheeling by Dunlevy, McLure with machinery by Sweeney.  Once owned by Capt. Charles Booth       

Liberty No. 2  1861-71 SW P built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with machinery by Sweeney.  Civil War transport

Liberty No. 4  1863-84 ST T built at Wheeling for Capt. John K. Booth by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with machinery by Sweeney

Lizzie Townsend 1882-1904 ST T hull built at Brownsville and completed at Wheeling by A.J. Sweeney & Son.  She once towed barges from West Wheeling to Top Mill in North Wheeling.  Capt. Charles G. Thomas was engineer on the boat for fifteen years.  He became a U.S. Inspector of Boilers and Engines at the Wheeling office April 21, 1898.  The boat burned at Wheeling Jan 23, 1904.  Thad Thomas, owner of the City Of Wheeling was his brother

Lone Wanderer 1881-86 plus Rig the boat used a threshing machine engine on a raft with a shanty on its deck

Lotus               1856-58 ST P built at Wheeling

Louisville       1863-64 ST P built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with machinery by Phillips

Luella Brown  1890-1908 plus ST P hull built at Murraysville, W. Va. and completed by Sweeney at Wheeling

M

M.G. Knox      1881-85+ ST P hull built at Knox Yard Harmar, Ohio / Marietta, Ohio cabin and machinery by Sweeney at Wheeling.  The Prince family owned this boat when her name changed to Tillie in 1885

Madison          1828-(?) P built at the Bell Yard

Magnet            1846-52 ST P built by McNaughton & Dunlevy at the West Wheeling Yard with Phillips machinery

Manchester     1858-60 SW P built at Wheeling

Manhattan       1897-(?) ST P built at Wheeling by General Engineering Co. formerly the Sweeney Co.  Capt. Lee Anshultz owned the boat

Mars                1818-(?) P built by James Pemberton Yard with machinery built by Phillips then of Steubenville, Ohio

Mary Stephens 1847-55 SW P hull by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling completed at Wheeling by Dunlevy, McLure with machinery by Phillips.  This was the first boat built at Wheeling to have a ‘Texas’ (a cabin of rooms) placed on the hurricane deck

Mexico            1859-65 SW P built at Wheeling

Michigan        1865-81 SW T although not originally built at Wheeling, she had served in the Civil War and was entirely rebuilt as a ST Towboat by Sweeney at Wheeling in 1874

Mike Davis     1878-86 plus ST P built at Wheeling by Sweeney and owned by Mike Davis of Fish Creek

Minneapolis    1869-(?) SW P hull and superstructure built at Wheeling and completed at Pittsburgh

Minnesota       1866-81 SW P built at Wheeling and rebuilt into a railroad transfer in 1881, and renamed Transfer No. 2.  Sweeney machinery

Minnie Bay     1883-89 SWP hull built at Belle Vernon, Pa. and completed at the Wheeling yard by Sweeney.  John M. Sweeney purchased the Belle Vernon yard from William McFall.

Monitor           1876-85 ST T built in Wheeling by Sweeney, and owned by the Monitor Towboat and Lumber Co., John A. Armstrong, offices at Tenth and Market Street in Wheeling.  They owned the Nail City and the Ed. Hobbs towboats.  Engines were Hobbs, Taylor & Co.

Morning Light            1858-63 SW P hull built at Belle Vernon, Pa., and completed at Wheeling by Wilson & Dunlevy with machinery by Sweeney

Morning Star  1860-66 SW P built by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling

Mount Clare   1868-1903 ST T built in Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with Sweeney machinery.  Built for the B&O to transfer barges, she was later listed as owned by the Monitor Towboat and Lumber Co. and the Armstrongs called her the Clara

Mt. Pleasant    1839-(?) P hull and cabin built by Elijah Murray in Wheeling with A.M. Phillips machinery

Muscatine       1863-80 SW P built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with engines by Hobbs, Taylor & Company.  The Muscatine was launched Sept. 16, 1863

N

Nail City         1872-91 ST T built at Wheeling engines by Ed Hobbs of Hobbs, Taylor & Company Foundry.  Ed leased the boat to the Wheeling Towboat & Barge Co.   also known as the Monitor Towboat and Lumber Co.  The Armstrongs purchased the Nail City and operated it along with the Ed Hobbs, Mount Clare, Monitor and Whale towboats

Nettie Quill     1886-1915 ST P hull built by Sweeney Works at Freedom, Pa. by Tom Dunbar and completed at Wheeling.  She was renamed Monroe in 1915

New St. Paul   1852-57 SW P built by Wilson & Dunlevy at Wheeling and named the St. Paul. However, she was registered as the New St. Paul, with engines by Phillips

New State       1865-73 ST P built by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler at Wheeling built for Capt. John McLure, Jr.  She was sold to Booth Battelle & Co. who ran the Wharfboat at Wheeling.  Capt. C.H. Booth ran the boat out of Wheeling.  Her machinery was built by Phillips

Novelty           1859-61 SW P built at Wheeling and went to Confederate registry in 1861           

O

Odd Fellow     1862-65 SW P built at Wheeling                              

Orb                  1854-60 ST P built at Wheeling

Orion               1851-63 ST P built at Wheeling and ran Wheeling-Marietta

P

Patrick Henry 1862-65 SW Ferry built at Wheeling

Peoria City      1864-69 SW P hull built at Sardis, Ohio and completed at Wheeling

Peytona           1867-73 Prop T built at Wheeling, rebuilt and renamed Peytona No. 2

Picayune         1846-51 ST P built at Wheeling by the Dunlevy, McLure Yard for Phillips.  Capt. Samuel Irwin, accepting delivery, spoke only French and wrote out information for the newspaper in French and that is how the Wheeling paper printed it, in French.  He paid for the boat with “DIX” notes.  Machinery was Phillips

Planter            1841-(?) SW T built by James Pemberton for Capt. James Beebe owner of the towboat Tiger with engines by Phillips

Planter            1860-75 SW P the second of this name built by James Pemberton  Built for Charles V. Wells of Sistersville, W. Va.  Wells registered the boat confederate in 1863 it was captured by Union forces in 1866

Potomac          1865-68 ST P built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler machinery by Phillips

R

R.E. Phillips   1886-94 ST P hull built at Freedom, Pa. completed at Wheeling by Sweeney.  She sank in 1894, and was raised and rebuilt as the   She towed the City Of Wheeling from Clarington to Marietta to have her engines installed in 1900.  F.A. Goebel was lost in 1907

R.R. Hudson   1866-75 ST P hull built at Murraysville and completed at Wheeling.  Built for and owned by Mr. R.R. Hudson who owned the steamboat Hudson

Rattler             1863-66 SW P built at Wheeling and ran Wheeling-Clarington

Regular           1884-1900+ SW P built at Wheeling by Sweeney from the hull of the Scioto using its machinery.  Capt. Thad S. Thomas owned the Scioto.  He was the owner of the 1900 built City Of Wheeling

Reporter          1886-(?) built at Wheeling Undocumented

Reserve           1863-70 built at Wheeling Capt. W.M. List and ran out of Wheeling

Revolution      1848-49 a Rig built at Wheeling

Right of Way  1867-70 ST P hull built at Freedom, Pa., and completed at Wheeling with machinery by Phillips

Roanoke          1864-65 ST P hull built at California, Pa., and completed at Wheeling Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with Sweeney machinery

Robert Emmett 1890-95 SW Ferry hull built at Wellsville, Ohio and completed at Wheeling by Sweeney

Rover              1863-83 ST T built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler with Sweeney engines

S

St. Cloud         1846-53 SW P built at Wheeling

St. Jacobs Oil  1846-80 ST P built at Wheeling had signs painted on sides ‘St. Jacobs Oil’ renamed the Susie B. in 1880, and then in 1888 she was renamed Suwannee 1900-1920 when she was in Florida.  She was once owned by Henry Ford, and is now at Greenfield Village Museum, Dearborn, Michigan 

St. Johns         1864-76 ST P hull built at Murraysville and completed at Wheeling.  A List owned boat

St. Lawrence   1879-95 SW P hull built at Murraysville completed at Wheeling by Sweeney with engines from Express No. 2, her ‘Famous’ Sweeney made whistle went on and on to other boats

St. Marys        1867-72 SW P built at Wheeling by Sweeney for Capt. T.C. Sweeney

Salado             1868-76 ST P built at Wheeling

Sallie V.          1867-72 SW P hull built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler and completed at St. Marys, W. Va.

Sawmill Clipper 1880-(?) a Rig-saw mill built at Wheeling

Science           1869-82 ST P built at Wheeling.  A boat owned by Capt. Phil Anshutz

Senate             1845-52 SW P built at Wheeling by Dunlevy, McLure for Capt. John McLure, Jr. with engines by Phillips

Senator            1846-1852 SW P built at Wheeling Dunlevy, McLure for Capt. John McLure, Jr. with Phillips engines

Sidney             1880-1938 ST P hull built at Murraysville and completed at Wheeling by Sweeney for Wm. M. List, and named for his mother Sidney.  Originally painted yellow (Sidney’s favorite color) when owned by Capt. Charles D. and Wm. M. List.  She was renamed Washington in 1921-38  Louis Armstrong got his first job on this boat when owned by Streckfus, and ran New Orleans to St. Paul

Signal              1862-64 ST P Converted to a tin-clad by the Union Army and renamed #8 Signal.  Confederates forces captured her in 1864.  Her Iron (tin) plating came from Wheeling’s Top Mill

Signet              1862-64 SW P built at Wheeling 

Silas Wright   1847-54 SW P built at Wheeling

Silver Star       1856-60 ST P built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Wheeler for Sweeney. She burned in 1860 with a loss of five lives

Sonora             1865-65 ST P built at Wheeling

Southern         1857-61 ST P built at Wheeling and went to Confederate registry in 1861.  Phillips machinery

Star State        1851-53 SW P built at Wheeling

Stella Wilds    1886-1900 ST P hull built at Brownsville completed at Wheeling and built under contract as a U.S. Mail boat.  Built by A.J. Sweeney & Son for Capt. Tom Prince of Wheeling

Sunny South   1860-67 SW P built at Wheeling

Sunshine         1892-1904 ST P hull & framing built at Brownsville, Pa.  Completed at Wheeling by Sweeney, one of the first to be electrified and lighted 

Swan               1861-69 SW P built at Wheeling

T

T.M. Bayne     1890-1904 ST P hull built at Brownsville completed at Wheeling by Sweeney

T.P. Leathers  1885-90 ST P hull built at Freedom, Pa. completed at Wheeling by Sweeney the first boat built by John M. Sweeney after he had purchased the Freedom yard in 1884.  Sweeney already owned the Belle Vernon Yard

Tempest          1874-1917 SW P built at Wheeling had a sawmill engine and belt driven wheels

Thomas Swann 1853-57 SW P built at Wheeling by Wilson & Dunlevy with machinery by Phillips.  She ran in the Wheeling & Louisville Union Line

Tide                 1881-1900 ST T hull built at Clarington completed by Sweeney at Wheeling

Tiger               1836-(?) SW T built by James Pemberton.  Maybe the first towboat built at Wheeling.  Phillips built her for Capt. James Beebe, see the towboat Planter 1841

Tigress                        1836-(?) P built by the James Pemberton Yard

Tinsie Moore  1890-95 ST P hull built at Brownsville and completed at Wheeling by Sweeney

Tioga               1840-49 SW P built by James Pemberton with machinery by Phillips

Transit            1878-95 plus ST Ferry hull built at Murraysville and completed at Wheeling by Sweeney

Traveler          1828-(?) P built at the Bell Yard

V

Virginia          1818-(?) P built at Wheeling by James Pemberton probably Phillips machinery.  She was the first to steam up the Mississippi River to the Minnesota River

Virginia Farmer 1850-57 ST F built at West Wheeling by McNaughton & Dunlevy with Phillips machinery

W

Washington    1816-24 P built at Wheeling by Henry M. Shreve.  The first steamboat built at Wheeling, and the “First Successful Western River Steamboat”

Warsaw           1832-(?) P built at the Bell Yard with engines by Phillips

Welcome         1879-83 plus ST P built at Wheeling

West Virginia 1829-(?) P built at the Bell Yard

West Wheeling 1860-1895 built at West Wheeling by McNaughton & Dunlevy sank once in 1867

Western          1845-49 SW P built at Wheeling

William Armstrong 1846-49 ST P built at Wheeling by Dunlevy, McLure with engines by Phillips

Wm. H. Dunlevy 1858-68 SW Ferry built at Wheeling by Wilson, Dunlevy & Co. with Phillips machinery

William H. Harrison 1862-85 ST T built at Wheeling as a ‘transfer’ boat.  This was the first boat used to transfer B. & O. Passengers and Freight from Wheeling to Bellaire.  Later owned by the Armstrongs.  Machinery was by the Sweeney Co.

William Penn  1847-54 SW P built by McNaughton & Dunlevy at West Wheeling and supplied with machinery by Phillips.

Winfield Scott 1849-55 SW P hull built at Knox yard at Harmar, Ohio, with Phillips engines

2 Responsesso far.

  1. Nice blog here! Also your web site loads up fast! What web host are you using? Can I get your affiliate link to your host? I wish my website loaded up as fast as yours lol

  2. JohnBowman says:

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